Practicing patience

"Patience is the art of hoping."  Luc de Clapiers

There are times when I am out photographing that I have to force myself to be patient. About a month ago, I was coming back from my morning kayak and getting close to the location where I get out of the water, when I spotted this Snowy Egret. I hadn’t spent much time being close to a Snowy in a while, so I diverted my direction and headed towards the bird. At first the bird was not in very good light, I almost left the area, but I saw it was heading to a more interesting spot, so I decided to sit and wait. As usual, whenever I am sitting and watching animals, I engage them in conversation. I was telling the egret how beautiful it was and asking it to meander a bit to my left so it could get in better light.

After a moment the egret moved to this location where I got to watch it try and catch some prey.

4010-180217-_5D40435.jpg

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4010-180217-_5D40440.jpgAll three images 1/500 sec; f/7.1; ISO 1250; 400mm

Next it moved from that average lighting situation to this high key lighting situation.

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1/500 sec; f/7.1; ISO 800; 428mm

The area with that light was not very big, and I thanked the Snowy for moving there since I thought it so nice.

Then it moved out of the high key area and I encouraged it to keep going so it would approach an “edge of light” area, where there was a deep shadow behind.  Fortunately for me it obliged and headed that direction. At first it didn’t go to the area of direct sunlight and instead flirted with a nearby region.

4010-180217-_5D40602.jpg1/500; f/9; ISO 800; 309mm

And finally it moved into the direct light and was bathed in a warm swatch of light against the deep shadow.

4010-180217-_5D40642-Edit.jpg1/500 sec; f/9; ISO 800; 256mm

Leaving the shadows, the egret ventured out into the sun and once again the light was totally different. It moved very close to my still kayak. I thanked the egret for being so cooperative and allowing me to be so close.

4010-180217-_5D40660.jpg1/500 sec; f9; ISO 800; 200mm

And in the beat of its wings it took off for a new location to forge in and I turned for home. The whole encounter lasted 10 minutes.

It pays to be patient!

 

 

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